REACH is a European Union(EU) regulation aimed at protecting human health and the environment from the risks posed by chemicals, as well as promoting alternative methods for chemical hazard assessment to reduce tests on animals. REACH stands for Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and restriction of Chemicals and came into effect on 1 June 2007. REACH applies to all chemical substances, whether it is a chemical used in an industrial process or in daily life such as in a cleaning solution or paint. To comply with the regulation, Manufacturers and Importers must identify and manage the risks related to the substances they market in the EU.

The European Chemicals Agency (ECHA), has identified several chemicals as Substance of Very High Concern (SVHC), for which usage within the European Union may be subject to authorisation under the REACH Regulation. This SVHC list is updated periodically, and each update usually adds more chemicals into the candidate list. With this dynamism in the SVHC list, affected companies have to invest in a significant ongoing effort to keep themselves up-to-date and assess any emerging risks to their supply chain or product line due to the REACH regulations.

Our services are used by companies across different industry verticals, for different needs ranging from an initial consulting engagement to collecting REACH declarations from suppliers. With the changing SVHC list, most companies also leverage our team to get periodic updated certifications and declarations from suppliers, to keep their compliance data fresh and accurate.

Our REACH compliance services:

  • REACH Consulting and Training
  • Supplier declarations and certifications
  • Full Material Declaration (FMD)
  • REACH Reporting
  • REACH Data Maintenance/refresh

Frequently Asked Questions – REACH

  1. What is Reach regulation compliance?

    REACH is a new European law regulating the use and production of chemical substances.

  2. What is reach SVHC?

    Substances that are one of the following:

    • carcinogenic, mutagenic or toxic to reproduction (CMRs)
    • persistent, bio-accumulative and toxic (PBTs)
    • very persistent and bio-accumulative (vPvBs)
    • seriously and / or irreversibly damaging the environment or human health, as substances damaging the hormone system. The general aim of REACH is to replace these potentially very hazardous substances by safer alternatives whenever possible. If this is not possible, in exceptional cases hazardous substances can be authorized if the registrant can prove that
    • an adequate risk control is guaranteed
    • the benefits for the society or the economy are estimated higher than the potential risk
    • no alternative substances are existent according to research results Every such authorization is however limited in time in order to encourage research for an alternative substance. If the potentially hazardous substances are used for R&D purposes, exemptions can be granted.
  3. What are the penalties for non-REACH compliance?

    Failure to register means that the substance must not be imported or manufactured within the EU.

  4. How is the REACH legislation organized?

    The registration rights belong to you for 10 years. After that period the data will be made available for all other registrants.

  5. What is Authorization under REACH??

    If a substance or preparation is considered hazardous in accordance with Directive 67/548/EEC or 1999/45/EC or if the substance is a PBT or a vPvB, the supplier must prepare a SDS (safety data sheet). The preparation of such an SDS is independent of the amount of the substance.

  6. What paperwork do I need for a REACH inspection?

    A chemical safety assessment (CSA) is a part of the registration dossier that must be prepared, if the import of a substance is bigger than 10 tonnes a year. It should list the hazards of the substances and assess their risks. The Chemical Safety Report (CSR) completes the risk assessment by stating how the risks are adequately controlled. The risk assessment needs to be performed for all different exposure scenarios, that is: for all ways in which the substance is manufactured or used, including the different ways of control the manufacturers or importers exert in the process. The manufacturer or importer communicates all such exposure scenarios to the downstream users in the safety data sheet (SDS). The downstream users should then assure themselves that their particular use of the substance is covered by the exposure scenarios identified. If not already covered, the downstream users can identify their use to the manufacturer/importer, and the manufacturer/importer can then choose to include this use in the CSA. If a downstream user chooses not to reveal their use of a particular substance to the importer or manufacturer, then they must prepare their own CSA.

  7. What is a Substance?

    A chemical element and its compounds in the natural state or procured by a manufacturing process. This includes all additives necessary to preserve the element’s stability and all impurities caused in the production process. It excludes all solvents that can be separated from the element without changing its stability or composition

  8. What are substances of very high concern (SVHC)?

    Substances that are one of the following:

    • carcinogenic, mutagenic or toxic to reproduction (CMRs)
    • persistent, bio-accumulative and toxic (PBTs)
    • very persistent and bio-accumulative (vPvBs)
    • seriously and / or irreversibly damaging the environment or human health, as substances damaging the hormone system
    • The general aim of REACH is to replace these potentially very hazardous substances by safer alternatives whenever possible. If this is not possible, in exceptional cases hazardous substances can be authorized if the registrant can prove that

    • an adequate risk control is guaranteed
    • the benefits for the society or the economy are estimated higher than the potential risk
    • no alternative substances are existent according to research results
    • Every such authorization is however limited in time in order to encourage research for an alternative substance. If the potentially hazardous substances are used for R&D purposes, exemptions can be granted.

    • carcinogenic, mutagenic or toxic to reproduction (CMRs)
    • persistent, bio-accumulative and toxic (PBTs)
    • very persistent and bio-accumulative (vPvBs)
    • seriously and / or irreversibly damaging the environment or human health, as
    • The general aim of REACH is to replace these potentially very hazardous substances by safer alternatives whenever possible. If this is not possible, in exceptional cases hazardous substances can be authorized if the registrant can prove that

    • an adequate risk control is guaranteed
    • the benefits for the society or the economy are estimated higher than the potential risk
    • no alternative substances are existent according to research results Every such authorization is however limited in time in order to encourage research for an alternative substance. If the potentially hazardous substances are used for R&D purposes, exemptions can be granted.
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